Sunday, June 19, 2016

Tropical Storm Danielle (2016)

Storm Active: June 19-21

A tropical wave moved over the eastern Atlantic from Africa during the first week of June. However, it being so early in the hurricane season, the system had no opportunity to develop further for nearly two weeks, when it began to produce thunderstorm activity near the coast of Nicaragua on June 15. The wave continued generally west-northwestward for the next few days, during which time land interaction inhibited organization. On June 18, it emerged into the Bay of Campeche, and a low pressure center formed in association with the wave. During the next day or so, moderate wind shear affected the system, hindering convective banding. However, the center of circulation became better defined on June 19 as shear gradually lessened, while increasing shower activity showed hints of banding in the northern semicircle. As a result, the system was designated Tropical Depression Four.

After a brief lull in convective activity that evening, a large area of deep convection blossomed overnight, albeit not all that organized about the center of circulation. By the morning of June 20, reconnaissance aircraft discovered gale force winds in the system, prompting an upgrade to Tropical Storm Danielle. This was the earliest naming of a fourth storm in the history of Atlantic hurricane seasons, beating out the record set by Tropical Storm Debby in 2012 by 3 days. Heavy rain began over the Mexican coast on the west side of the Bay of Campeche and continued as Danielle moved west-northwestward toward land. Danielle reached its peak intensity of 45 mph winds and a minimum pressure of 1007 mb before making landfall in Mexico that evening. The storm brought 8-12 inches of rain to a large area of Mexico as it quickly weakened over the mountainous terrain of Mexico. It dissipated early on June 21.

During its brief period as a tropical system, Danielle brought heavy rains to eastern Mexico.

Forming in the central Bay of Campeche, Danielle did not have time to strengthen significantly before it moved westward over land.

No comments: